Before there was Rosa Parks, there was Claudette Colvin.

Claudette Colvin



A great deal has been said about Rosa Parks and her refusal to relinquish her seat on a bus to a white person; however, nothing much written down in history about Claudette Colvin. Below is her biography that I found during my search for BLACK history content.


On March 2, 1955, Colvin was riding home on a city bus after school when a bus driver told her to give up her seat to a white passenger. She refused, saying, “It’s my constitutional right to sit here as much as that lady. I paid my fare, it’s my constitutional right.” Colvin felt compelled to stand her ground. “I felt like Sojourner Truth was pushing down on one shoulder and Harriet Tubman was pushing down on the other—saying, ‘Sit down girl!’ I was glued to my seat,” she later told Newsweek.

Arrested for Violating Segregation Laws

After her refusal to give up her seat, Colvin was arrested on several charges, including violating the city’s segregation laws. For several hours, she sat in jail, completely terrified. “I was really afraid, because you just didn’t know what white people might do at that time,” Colvin later said. After her minister paid her bail, she went home where she and her family stayed up all night out of concern for possible retaliation.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People briefly considered using Colvin’s case to challenge the segregation laws, but they decided against it because of her age. She also had become pregnant and they thought an unwed mother would attract too much negative attention in a public legal battle. Her son, Raymond, was born in March 1956.

In court, Colvin opposed the segregation law by declaring herself not guilty. The court, however, ruled against her and put her on probation. Despite the light sentence, Colvin could not escape the court of public opinion. The once-quiet student was branded a troublemaker by some, and she had to drop out of college. Her reputation also made it impossible for her to find a job.

Plaintiff in ‘Browder v. Gayle’

Despite her personal challenges, Colvin became one of the four plaintiffs in the Browder v. Gayle case, along with Aurelia S. Browder, Susie McDonald and Mary Louise Smith (Jeanatta Reese, who was initially named a plaintiff in the case, withdrew early on due to outside pressure). The decision in the 1956 case, which had been filed by Fred Gray and Charles D. Langford on behalf of the aforementioned African American women, ruled that Montgomery’s segregated bus system was unconstitutional.

Two years later, Colvin moved to New York City, where she had her second son, Randy, and worked as a nurse’s aide at a Manhattan nursing home. She retired in 2004.

Legacy and ‘Claudette Colvin Goes to Work’

Much of the writing on civil rights history in Montgomery has focused on the arrest of Parks, another woman who refused to give up her seat on the bus, nine months after Colvin. While Parks has been heralded as a civil rights heroine, Colvin’s story has received little notice. Some have tried to change that. Rita Dove penned the poem “Claudette Colvin Goes to Work,” which later became a song. Phillip Hoose also wrote about her in the young adult biography Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice.

Citation Information

Article Title

Claudette Colvin Biography

Author

Biography.com Editors

Website Name

The Biography.com


At the time, the NAACP and other Black organizations felt Rosa Parks made a better icon for the movement than a teenager. As an adult with the right look, Rosa Parks was also the secretary of the NAACP, and was both well-known and respected – people would associate her with the middle class and that would attract support for the cause. —pbs.com

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